The Collection

Flowers on a Window Sill

Winifred Nicholson

Flowers on a Window Sill

© copyright Winifred Nicholson Trustees
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Tab Label (see title)
ArtistWinifred Nicholson (1893-1981)
TitleFlowers on a Window Sill
Datec.1945-1946
MediumOil on board
Dimensionsheight: 49.50 cm, width: 46.50 cm
InscriptionNone
AcquisitionPurchased from Alex Reid & Lefevre, March 1947
LocationUK, London, Government Art Collection
GAC number298
 

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Tab Label (see title)
Tab Label (see title)

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Tab Label (see title)
Tab Label (see title)
Tab Label (see title)

Winifred Nicholson

Winifred Nicholson was born in Oxford and studied at the Byam Shaw School of Art in London. After travelling in Asia, she married the artist Ben Nicholson in 1920. They lived between Switzerland and London. From 1928 to 1935 both were members of the Seven and Five Society, along with Christopher Wood, Ivon Hitchens, John Piper, Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth. After separating in 1931, Winifred moved to Paris with their children where artists including Jean Hélion and Piet Mondrian encouraged her to develop her own style. From 1939 she lived in Cumbria but regularly travelled abroad. Her career was overshadowed by the achievements of her ex-husband, yet a major memorial show at the Tate in 1987 helped to redress this.