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Variations on an endless theme

In an audio interview with Natalie Dower which took place on 21 October 2009 in her London studio in Vauxhall, the artist discusses how her work has developed over a long career. Dower is interviewed by Nicky Hodge, Curator of Information and Research at the GAC and a painter who also had a studio in the same building. From her early beginnings as a Systems painter, Dower provides some fascinating insights into her artistic process including the part played by mathematics; the role of accident and chance; the issue of gender in art and the inspiration she gains from working abroad. To listen to the podcast click the link to the right, alternatively it is available on iTunes, simply search for "Government Art Collection".

Natalie Dower in her studio

Natalie Dower in her studio

© Crown Copyright

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Natalie Dower was born in 1931 in London and studied at St Martin's, Camberwell and the Slade schools between 1948 and 1954. At Camberwell School of Art in the early 1950s she was part of a generation heavily influenced by the realism of the Euston Road School. Dower however became interested in Constructivism and through her great friends the artist couple Malcolm Hughes and Jean Spencer, developed her own particular form of Systems painting. She has been working to this theme ever since. Dower's first one man show was at Concourse Gallery at the Polytechnic of Central London (1979). Since then she has had a number of solo shows including one at Air Gallery (1983); Gummesons Konstgalleri, Stockholm (1986); Transformations, Transformations 2, The Secret Life of the Grid and Out of the Arc at Curwen Gallery (1987, 1990, 1992, 1995 respectively). She has also been included in several important group exhibitions including the Hayward Annual (1982) and the Countervail exhibitions (1992, 1993) with Jean Spencer. Dower's work is in public and private collections around the world including the Arts Council of Great Britain, the Government Art Collection, London and Mondriaanhuis Amersfoort, Holland.

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